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NEW UPDATES Asean Affairs  28 August 2015  

Bomb takes toll on Thai tourism but ‘jitters would not last’

THAILAND’S worst-ever bombing has caused a 17 per cent fall in tourist arrivals, putting pressure on revenues vital to the military government’s moves to resuscitate a struggling economy.

Average daily arrivals to Thailand fell from 85,000 before the deadly August 17 attack to 70,000 at present, the tourism ministry said yesterday, but officials were confident the slump was temporary and said annual targets remained unchanged.

Fourteen foreigners – seven from mainland China and Hong Kong – were among the 20 people killed in the attack at a famous Hindu shrine in Bangkok’s commercial heart, for which the key suspect remains at large.

“The tourism impact... will probably be a short-term impact,” Tourism and Sports Minister Kobkarn Wattanavrangkul told a news conference.

“Tourism will definitely pick up in the fourth quarter.”

The government is aiming for 28.8 million arrivals and 2.2 trillion baht (US$61.82 billion) in revenue this year from tourism, which has become even more crucial as Southeast Asia’s second-biggest economy stutters amid weak exports, manufacturing and retail spending.

The national planning agency has revised down its annual economic growth forecast to 2.7-3.2 per cent this year, although experts say that is unrealistic. Growth was just 0.4 per cent in April-June from the previous quarter.

With a draw of top-class beaches, food and entertainment, Thailand’s tourism makes up about 10 per cent of GDP.

The kingdom had 2.1 million visitors between August 1 and August 23, a 31.7 per cent rise from the same period in 2014, generating 102.8 billion baht, the ministry said. Arrivals from Januaray 1 to August 23, were 19.6 million, also a 31 per cent year-on-year increase.

David Scowsill, president of the World Travel and Tourism Council, said tourists jitters would not last.

“Thailand is not going to go through massive levels of trauma,” he said. “When we look out at the next six months, there’s no indication of wholesale cancellations.”

Conferences and meetings, which are key revenue earners, had not been seriously impacted, the ministry said.

Sumate Sudasna, president of the Thailand Incentive and Convention Association, said most large events had gone ahead, including an international surgery congress in Bangkok, at which only 100 of the 2,600 participants had cancelled.

“It’s business as usual for Thailand,” he added.

But data from ForwardKeys, which tracks over 14 million travel bookings a day, suggests otherwise. Its data for the five days after the bombing compared to the same period in 2014 showed bookings to Thailand down 65 per cent and business travel from China tanking 350 per cent.

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This year in Thailand-what next?

AseanAffairs   04 January 2011
By David Swartzentruber      

It is commonplace in journalism to write two types of articles at the transition point between the year that has passed and the New Year. As this writer qualifies as an “old hand” in observing Thailand with a track record dating back 14 years, it is time take a shot at what may unfold in Thailand in 2011.

The first issue that can’t be answered is the health of Thailand’s beloved King Bhumibol, who is now 83 years old. He is the world's longest reigning monarch, but elaborate birthday celebrations in December failed to mask concern over his health. More






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