Google

ASEANAFFAIRS
Sign up | Log in
Subscribe to AseanAffairs Magazine
SAVE OUR PLANET
View Samples
AseanAffairs Magazine September - October 2011
CONTENT • ASEAN TRAVELLER
• ASEAN MONEY • FEATURED COMPANIES
• ASEAN SECURITY

INSIDE OUT

• ASEAN TECH P

 

 

SAVE OUR PLANET
This year has seen increasing climate change disasters throughout the world.

In the cover story of this edition, Asean Affairs takes a look at the issues and possible solutions to reduce the costly

COVER STORY   Read More... 

Testimonials – What our Readers are saying about us
Read the full story.  Subscribe now!



 



   ARE ASEAN CITIES
  THE NEW ATLANTIS?
 

 Will Bangkok and Jakarta end up underwater by 2030 and 2025?
A signature symbol of Asia has always been the mega-city with Tokyo and Hong Kong being legendary examples. The continued economic growth throughout
the region is also spurring urbanization and the growth of ever larger cities,particularly in Asean.

>> “AT SAVE OUR
PLANET 1 IN 2010, I
SAID 44 YEARS AGO
BANGKOK WILL BE
UNDERWATER IN MY
LIFETIME. THEY CALLED
ME CRAZY. NOW I’M
SAYING YOU HAVE
GOT TO MOVE FROM
BANGKOK WITHIN 10
YEARS. THIS IS PRESSING
AND URGENT. YOU
CANNOT LIVE HERE
ANYMORE.”
- DR. ART-ONG JUMSAI
NA AYUDHYA, DIRECTOR,
THE SOCIETY FOR
THE PRESERVATION OF
WATER, THAILAND, FORMER
NASA CONSULTANT
WORKING ON THE MARS
LANDER PROJECT.<<

In Asean, Bangkok and Jakarta, the capitals of Asean’s two largest economies, continue to extend beyond their current populations of 10 million. Thailand’s current urban population is 38 percent of its total population and is expanding at 1.8 percent yearly. Indonesia’s urban population is 44 percent of the total and is increasing by 1.7 percent yearly.

By 2025 Jakarta is expected to be the world’s largest metropolitan area. It is currently mapped at 662 square kilometers,while Bangkok is currently ranked 13th in urban land mass.

This growth is stressing natural resources to the breaking point and the key concern in both cities is water-too much and too little. Rising sea levels due to global warming could submerge both cities under the Pacific Ocean. Land levels in both cities are sinking because of the weight of additional construction on the land, especially skyscrapers, and the pumping of potable water from underground aquifers.

Both Bangkok and Jakarta are on a Geohazards International list of the world’s largest 17 cities that risk being swamped by rising sea levels in approaching decades.

BANGKOK
Humans naturally like to settle near a body of water, there are very few cities that are situated in an area devoid of streams.The earliest humans found waterways were good sources of food and transport. The ocean is particularly appealing as it serves as a highway for international trade and commerce.

More than one-tenth of the world’s population, or 643 million people, live in low-lying coastal areas at risk from climate change, say U.S. and European experts. Most imperiled, in descending order, are China, India, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Indonesia, Japan, Egypt, the U.S., Thailand and the Philippines. Other imperiled Asian cities are Dhaka, Manila, Calcutta, Phnom Penh, Ho Chi Minh City and Shanghai.

Bangkok is approximately 65 kilometers (40 miles) from the ocean on the Chao Phraya River (The River of Kings), Thailand’s main river as it snakes toward the Gulf of Thailand. The gulf’s waters have been rising by about a tenth of an inch a year, about the same as the world average. But the city has been sinking at about 4 inches annually.......................






<< Back to Contents


Back to Top


...to Read the Complete Article Subscribe to ASEANAFFAIRS Magazine

Home | About Us | Contact Us | Special | Features | News | Magazine | Events | TV | Press Release | Advertise With us

Our Products | Work with us | Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Shipping/Delivery Policy


Version 5.0


advertisement


Copyright © 2007-2011 TIME INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT ENTERPRISES CO., LTD. All rights reserved.
Bangkok, Thailand
asean@aseanaffairs.com