Sign up | Log in



Home  >>   Daily News  >>   Laos News  >>   Environment  >>   Laos continues on dam
NEWS UPDATES Asean Affairs         25  June 2011

Laos continues on dam

Related Stories

 March 23, 2011
Activists join forces against Laos' Xayaburi Dam plan

October 29, 2010
Laos mining firm raises output

September 20, 2010
Currency depreciation, inflation challenge Laos

September 1,2010
Lao garment industry benefits from rising Chinese labour costs 

June 22, 2010
Laos to improve education

June 19, 2010
Dispute in Philippines over sex education

People board a ferry on the Mekong River at Houxieng town in Luang Prabang province, just upstream from the site of a proposed dam in Xayaburi province, Laos, earlier this month.

Environmentalists have accused the Lao government of going “rogue” in moving ahead with the controversial Xayaburi dam on the Mekong River despite grave concerns about the project and an unfinished regional decision-making process.

Laos said last month it would delay the US$3.8 billion project and subject it to further study following vocal concerns from Vietnam, Cambodia and Thailand that the project would dramatically affect water levels and decimate fish stocks throughout the Mekong Basin.

The four countries are bound by a 1995 agreement to hold consultations before building developments that would affect the river. After a special meeting in April of the Mekong River Commission – a regional body established under the 1995 treaty – the countries said they would delay a decision on whether to conclude discussion on the project until a summit later this year.

Documents obtained by The Phnom Penh Post yesterday, however, indicate that the project is going ahead regardless.

The conservation group International Rivers yesterday expressed alarm at Laos’s apparent disregard for its neighbours’ concerns.

“By deciding unilaterally that the regional decision-making process is complete, the Government of Laos has committed an egregious breach of trust and has joined the ranks of rogue nations,” Ame Trandem, the Mekong campaigner for International Rivers, said in a statement yesterday.

In a letter dated June 8, Xaypaseuth Phomsoupha, director-general of the department of energy promotion and development in the Lao Ministry of Mines and Energy, claimed that Vientiane had already met its obligations under the consultation process.

The letter, addressed to Xayaburi Power Co Ltd, a subsidiary of Thailand’s Ch Karnchang Public Co Ltd, the primary backer of the project, discussed a study by the Finnish consulting firm Pöyry contracted by the Lao government “to determine whether the Lao PDR had fulfilled its obligations pursuant to the 1995 Mekong Agreement”.

According to the letter, Xaypaseuth said Pöyry had found that “the Prior Consultation of the Xayaburi Project has now been completed and the Prior Consultation process has ended at the MRC Joint Committee level”.

Xaypaseuth concluded: “Accordingly, despite certain other remaining commitments, we hereby confirm that any necessary step in relation to the 1995 Mekong Agreement has been duly taken in a spirit of cooperation and working together of all relevant parties.”

The letter did not mention that a decision on whether to end the consultation process had been deferred to a meeting later this year, and regional governments had demanded more information about the project’s impact.

International Rivers said in its statement that the letters discussing the project raised questions about the study: “It now appears that the study was a cursory, one-month review of the [consultation] process and not a review of the environmental and social impacts of the project.”

Meanwhile, an “informal” meeting of MRC donors was held yesterday in Phnom Penh and was expected to continue today, with the Xayaburi project on the agenda, Surasak said.


Reach Southeast Asia!
10- Nations, 560- Million Consumers
And $1 -Trillion Market
We are the Voice of Southeast Asia Media Kit
The only Media Dedicated to Southeast Asia Advertising Rates for Magazine
  Online Ad Rates

Comment on this Article. Send them to

Letters that do not contain full contact information cannot be published.
Letters become the property of AseanAffairs and may be republished in any format.
They typically run 150 words or less and may be edited
submit your comment in the box below




1.  Verifier

1. Verifier

For security purposes, we ask that you enter the security code that is shown in the graphic. Please enter the code exactly as it is shown in the graphic.
Your Code
Enter Code

Today's  Stories    25  June  2011 Subsribe Now !
• Foreigners push Cambodians out of gold rush Subcribe: Asean Affairs Global Magazine
• Indonesia’s auto growth attracts investment Asean Affairs Premium
• Laos continues on dam
Research Reports
on Thailand 2007-2008

•Textiles and Garments Industry

•Coffee industry

•Leather and footwear industry

•Shrimp industry

• Genting moves into overseas markets
• Philippines outsourcing industry grew in first quarter
• Thai accounts protected
• Vietnamese inflation hits three-year high
• Vietnamese garment exports to reach $13.2b this year p

Asean Analysis    26  June  2011

Advertise Your Brand
• WEEKLY SUMMARY Sponsor Our Events

Asean Stock Watch    24  June  2011 

• Asean Stock Watch-June 24 p

ASEAN NEWS UPDATES      Updated: 04 January 2011

 • Women Shariah scholars see gender gap closing
• Bank Indonesia may hold key rate as inflation hits 7 percent

• Bursa Malaysia to revamp business rules
• Private property prices hit new high in Singapore
• Bangkok moves on mass transport
• Thai retailers are upbeat
• Rice exports likely to decline
• Vietnamese PM projects 10-year socioeconomic plan


This year in Thailand-what next?

AseanAffairs   04 January 2011
By David Swartzentruber      

It is commonplace in journalism to write two types of articles at the transition point between the year that has passed and the New Year. As this writer qualifies as an “old hand” in observing Thailand with a track record dating back 14 years, it is time take a shot at what may unfold in Thailand in 2011.

The first issue that can’t be answered is the health of Thailand’s beloved King Bhumibol, who is now 83 years old. He is the world's longest reigning monarch, but elaborate birthday celebrations in December failed to mask concern over his health. More


Home | About Us | Contact Us | Special Feature | Features | News | Magazine | Events | TV | Press Release | Advertise With us

Our Products | Work with us | Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Shipping/Delivery Policy | DISCLAIMER |

Version 5.0
Copyright © 2007-2015 TIME INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT ENTERPRISES CO., LTD. All rights reserved.
Bangkok, Thailand