Google

ASEANAFFAIRS
Sign up | Log in
Subscribe to AseanAffairs Magazine
BEGINNING OR THE END?
View Samples
AseanAffairs Magazine March - April 2011
CONTENT • ASEAN TECH
• ASEAN CORPORATE STRATEGY • ASEAN TRAVELLER
• ASEAN ENERGY

• BEYOND ASEAN

• ASEAN ENVIRONMENT INSIDE OUT
• ASEAN MONEY  • THE AWAKENING
 • ASEAN TALK      • SAVE OUR PLANET IV

 

 

A NEW REALIGNMENT or CONTINUING CHAOS?
Managing Editor David Swartzentruber sees a new global political restructuring as the answer to the current global chaos.


COVER STORY   Read More... 

Testimonials – What our Readers are saying about us
Read the full story.  Subscribe now!




 

 




CHINESE TRADE DEFICIT RAISES CONCERNS


VIETNAM
The volume of Chinese imports is hurting local Vietnamese businesses
The trade deficit with China has risen eightfold since 2002 to US$12.7 billion in 2010, or 102 percent of the total trade deficit.

Most of the imports are low-value goods such as clothing, toys, footwear, food, and vegetables that can be produced domestically. Cellphone imports were worth $791 million and vegetables and fruits, $156.13 million, accounting for 52.1 percent and 84.5 percent of Vietnam’s total imports of these goods.

With Chinese vegetables and fruits costing just half the price of their Vietnamese counterparts and keeping longer, wholesalers have no interest in buying domestic products from farmers in Dalat.

While import taxes are no longer levied on agricultural imports from China, Vietnam has no technical barriers either, Nguyen Ba Dinh, deputy head of customs at HCMC’s Cat Lai Port, said. Chinese toys are everywhere. At a shop in HCMC’s District 9, for instance, only one puzzle game and a packet of plastic fruit which has been unsold for over a year were Vietnamese made.

The shopkeeper said that he had stopped stocking Vietnamese toys due to their high prices...........


Boeung Kak Lake residents confrontation with cops in front of Premier Hun Sen’s residence

LAKESIDE FAMILIES DISPLACED


CAMBODIA

 The displacement of more than 4,000 families living at Boeung Kak Lake has been an emotional issue in Cambodia with lakeside residents complaining that the compensation they have been offered - US$8,500 in cash or 2 million riel (US$495) and apartments in Dangkor district - falls far below the value of their homes.

The land is being developed by a firm owned by ruling party senator Lao MengKhin, who signed a lease with the city to develop the lake area. In 2008, the government issued a sub-decree classifying the territory as state private land that could be legally leased to a developer, a move rights groups have called a retroactive attempt to provide legitimacy to the transaction...........


German representatives initially made their funding pledge at the Mekong River Commission’s meeting in Siem Reap.

LAOS RECEIVES GERMAN AID


LAOS

Germany has provided more than 31 million euros (US$43.9 million) as technical and financial assistance for developmentprojects in Laos for the 2011-2017 period. The assistance includes 11 million euro as financial assistance and over 20 million euro as technical assistance.

The financial assistance was for development of roads in rural areas in Sayaboury and Attapeu provinces, which will be provided through the KfW Development Bank (6.0 million euro)..........

 


The new U.S. envoy to Myanmar has met Daw Aung San Suu Kyi.


NEW ORDER AND NEW ENVOY


MYANMAR

Myanmar’s attempt to rebrand itself with a nominally civilian government was met with scepticism at home and abroad, with critics fearing army power has merely moved into the shadows.

While the new order provoked interest, there was little optimism.

The new parliament, which is dominated by the army hierarchy and lacks the participation of democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, was a “hot issue” with ordinary people.

The March 30 handover came after Myanmar’s first elections in 20 years last November, which were characterized as a sham to provide a civilian facade to army rule, and marred by the absence of Suu Kyi, and by claims of cheating..........


Pangolins, like this frightened one, are frequently poached in the Malay Peninsula for sale in restaurants in China

CONCERN GROWS ON WILDLIFE POACHING


BRUNEI

Although Brunei is small in size it is still part of one of the world’s richest and most biodiverse regions, the Malay Peninsula, which is a prime source for wildlife poaching.

A prime target is the pangolin, a rather shy armadillo-like animal that supposedly is tasty and possesses, at least to the Chinese, aphrodisiacal powers. On a regular basis, pickup trucks head north toward restaurants in China and are quite often intercepted on their journey, especially in Thailand.

Brunei’s Minister of Industry and Primary Resources, Pehin Orang Kaya Seri Utama Dato Seri Setia Hj Yahya Begawan Mudim Dato Paduka Hj Bakar, has called on communities to stifle the demand for threatened or endangered animals in order to stop the illegal practice altogether..........






  << Back   Page 3 of 3    


Back to Top

 

 ...to Read the Complete Article Subscribe to ASEANAFFAIRS Magazine

Home | About Us | Contact Us | Special | Features | News | Magazine | Events | TV | Press Release | Advertise With us

Our Products | Work with us | Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Shipping/Delivery Policy


Version 5.0


advertisement


Copyright © 2007-2011 TIME INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT ENTERPRISES CO., LTD. All rights reserved.
Bangkok, Thailand
asean@aseanaffairs.com