Google

ASEANAFFAIRS
Sign up | Log in

    ASEAN PROFILES

  ASEAN KEY DESTINATIONS

Home  >>   Daily News  >>Cambodia>>Politics>>CNRP candidate claims threat
NEWS UPDATES Asean Affairs     June 8, 2017  









CNRP candidate claims threat

The United Nations is investigating claims that military police attempted to kick an opposition commune chief candidate off a moving motorbike on the eve of the election in Kandal province, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights confirmed the day before yesterday.

Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP) commune chief candidate Ros Savoeurn said he was harassed and intimidated on June 1, just days before the June 4 poll that saw his party defeated by more than 2,500 votes in Kandal Stung district’s Doeum Reus commune, according to National Election Committee figures. Savoeurn said the CNRP still took two out of seven council seats.

The escalation to physical violence came after months of bribes and threats from the ruling Cambodian People’s Party (CPP), Savoeurn claimed, in a commune that houses Prime Minister Hun Sen’s Personal Bodyguard Unit and its commander, Hing Bun Heang.

Last week a Post investigation uncovered widespread allegations of troops being trucked into communes – including Roka commune, which neighbours Doeum Reus – in a bid to bolster votes.

“They intimidated and threatened my life,” Savoeurn said, saying he could still feel pain in his left thigh where the boot had struck him.

He said after sharing a meal with a friend, a man who appeared to be a bodyguard arrived, walkie-talkie in hand. Savoeurn left, but as he rode his motorbike, two men dressed in paramilitary uniform and wearing helmets drew their motorbike “very close”.

“The one sitting on the back used his leg to kick me,” he said. “I think they were trying to crash me and to kill me.”

He said he tried to push them off and sped up, turning into his village as they continued straight ahead.

Bodyguard Unit Commander Bun Heang flatly denied the accusations of intimidation but doubled down on the heated rhetoric that characterised the CPP’s campaign. “When was the motherf—er [a victim of] attempted murder? The election process was very smooth and it was the most just,” he said.

Bun Heang said he would not create trouble by shooting people in his own homeland and stressed everyone had a right to undertake political activities.

“When you lose, just accept it. [Don’t say you are] losing by making an excuse that someone attempted murder ... Be careful of lightning striking in the centre of your head during the rainy season,” he said. “Tell me what his name is – I will file a counter lawsuit against him.”

The friend who met with Savoeurn on June 1 asked not to be named for fear of retribution, but confirmed a bodyguard had come to his house, asked who Savoeurn was, and left around five minutes after Savoeurn. Later that night, he was visited by another bodyguard.

“When he came to my house I was very scared ... I could not sleep for two nights,” he said.

He said he “did not dare” to ask who they were or what they were doing in his home, as he feared he might be shot.

The UN’s Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) in Cambodia said they were looking into the case, but declined to elaborate.

In a document dated June 2 and seen by The Post yesterday, the Commune Election Council (CEC) declined to investigate Savoeurn’s complaint, saying his accusation of “attempted intentional murder” was a criminal matter and therefore outside the CEC’s authority.

While he could not comment on the specifics of the case, Sam Kuntheamy, of election watchdog Nicfec, disagreed with the CEC decision, saying “they cannot reject the complaint”.

“It is illegal ... any party cannot intimidate or threaten any political candidate,” he said, adding such a case could be both a criminal and a CEC matter.

“If there is a kind of intimidation or threatening, it’s not free or fair ... If people hear about that, they are scared and they have bad feelings.”

Savoeurn said he did not plan to file a complaint to police. “It seems pointless. Everything is under the ruling party ... and I am just a normal person,” he said.

“Maybe I should just stop. I am still concerned for my safety.”

He said local CPP activists operated on a pattern of bribes and threats, and the large presence of armed forces in the area made voters feel vulnerable. He hoped the attention of OHCHR would decrease the intimidation.

“When they cannot break me, if they can kill me, they will scare others,” he said. “As the leaders, we have to be braver.”


Reach Southeast Asia!
10- Nations, 560- Million Consumers
And $1 -Trillion Market
We are the Voice of Southeast Asia Media Kit
The only Media Dedicated to Southeast Asia Advertising Rates for Magazine
Online Ad Rates
Contact: marketing@aseanaffairs.com

Comment on this Article. Send them to  your.views@aseanaffairs.com

Letters that do not contain full contact information cannot be published.
Letters become the property of AseanAffairs and may be republished in any format.
They typically run 150 words or less and may be edited
 
or
submit your comment in the box below



 
Today's  Stories                          June 8, 2017 Subsribe Now !
• Myanmar gov’t working on national climate change policy Subcribe: Asean Affairs Global Magazine
• DICO to sell 45% State capital to investors
• Singapore slips to 24th most expensive city globally for expats
Research Reports
on Thailand 2007-2008

• Textiles and Garments Industry
• Coffee industry
• Leather and footwear industry
• Shrimp industry

• CNRP candidate claims threat
• Czech President starts State visit to Viet Nam
Asean Analysis                  June 2,  2017
• Asean Analysis June 2, 2017
Trump Should Call Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi
Advertise Your Brand

Asean Stock Watch June 7, 2017

• Asean Stock Watch-June 7, 2017
The Biweekly Update
• The Biweekly Update  June 2, 2017

ASEAN NEWS UPDATES      Updated: 04 January 2011

 • Women Shariah scholars see gender gap closing
• Bank Indonesia may hold key rate as inflation hits 7 percent
• Bursa Malaysia to revamp business rules
• Private property prices hit new high in Singapore • Bangkok moves on mass transport
• Thai retailers are upbeat
• Rice exports likely to decline • Vietnamese PM projects 10-year socioeconomic plan

ASEAN  ANALYSIS

This year in Thailand-what next?


AseanAffairs   04 January 2011
By David Swartzentruber      

It is commonplace in journalism to write two types of articles at the transition point between the year that has passed and the New Year. As this writer qualifies as an “old hand” in observing Thailand with a track record dating back 14 years, it is time take a shot at what may unfold in Thailand in 2011.

The first issue that can’t be answered is the health of Thailand’s beloved King Bhumibol, who is now 83 years old. He is the world's longest reigning monarch, but elaborate birthday celebrations in December failed to mask concern over his health. More

 


Name

Name


Email

Email



1.  Verifier

1. Verifier

For security purposes, we ask that you enter the security code that is shown in the graphic. Please enter the code exactly as it is shown in the graphic.
Your Code
Enter Code

Home | About Us | Contact Us | Special Feature | Features | News | Magazine | Events | TV | Press Release | Advertise With us

| Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy  | DISCLAIMER |

Version 5.0
Copyright © 2006-2019 TIME INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT ENTERPRISES CO., LTD. All rights reserved.
Bangkok, Thailand
asean@aseanaffairs.com