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Home  >>   Daily News  >>   Cambodia News  >>   Labor  >>   Cambodian migrant workers at risk
NEWS UPDATES Asean Affairs        17  May 2011

Cambodian migrant workers at risk

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Thailand has ordered an estimated 2 million migrant workers from Cambodia, Myanmar and Laos to register their presence by a deadline set two months from now or face legal action or deportation.

Under the scheme, migrant workers will be required to pay 3,880 baht (US$128) for health insurance, a medical check-up and work permits that allow their children, if younger than 15, to stay in the country, Thai media reported on Friday.

The July 14 registration deadline, confirmed by Nilim Baruah, chief technical advisor on Asian regional migration at the International Labour Organisation, drew mixed reactions from civil society organisations in Cambodia yesterday.

While some welcomed the move, others warned the mandatory registration process would either serve as a public relations stunt with no meaningful impact or could even have unintended negative consequences.

Baruah said registration would regulate migrant worker employment and better ensure the protection of rights. However, he questioned why such a short period of time had been given to register.

"It would have been better if there had been a bit more time given for the information dissemination process," he said. Mattieu Pellerin, a legal consultant with the rights group Licadho, said the 3,880 baht fee for registration could force legitimate workers underground or encourage debt bondage if employers agreed to cover the expense for them.

"If the process involves relatively large amounts of money for those official's fees and bribes and corruption fees, I think the end result will be forcing people into unofficial migrant work and you will end up with the opposite effect [to that intended]," he said.

"If this legal work is not accessible to them, then that would be an incentive to entice them into illegal work and then the risk of being trafficked increases," he said.

Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director at Human Rights Watch, said yesterday that the move represented an acknowledgement from the Thai government labour officials that their past labour migration policies had failed, but would not curb either corruption or opaque recruitment methods.

"In July, there will be crackdown on migrant workers. That will last for a couple of weeks while the Thais try to send a signal that: 'We're serious this time and a bunch of unfortunate migrant workers will get arrested and deported'," he said.

"The government is a little schizophrenic on this. On one hand they want workers to fill positions in key parts of the economy but other parts of the government see migrant workers as a security threat," he said.

"And then another part of the government, the police, just treat them like walking ATM machines - you just grab them and shake until the money comes out."

Robertson said Cambodian migrants in Thailand mainly worked in palm and rubber plantations, large farms, animal rearing and construction - especially on island resorts such as Koh Chang.


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ASEAN  ANALYSIS

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AseanAffairs   04 January 2011
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It is commonplace in journalism to write two types of articles at the transition point between the year that has passed and the New Year. As this writer qualifies as an “old hand” in observing Thailand with a track record dating back 14 years, it is time take a shot at what may unfold in Thailand in 2011.

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