Google

ASEANAFFAIRS
Sign up | Log in
View Samples AseanAffairs Magazine
Jan - Feb 2009
AseanAffairs-magazine-Jan-Feb_2009
  • COVER STORY                 
read... 
  • ASEAN TRAVELLER
read...
  • ASEAN MONEY       
read... 
  • BEYOND ASEAN   
read...
  • ASEAN AUTO
read...
  • INSIDE - OUT 
read...


 

 

BURMA’S WINKING WONDER

Shwedagon Pagoda is one of the world’s most sacred Buddhist landmarks, and the holiest site for Burmese pilgrims. Apart from the myths and legends surrounding its beginning, the great stupa is a curious witness to Burma’s long and tumultuous history of war, independence struggle and politics.

“ Then, a golden mystery upheaved itself on the horizon, a beautiful winking wonder that blazed in the sun … ”

That was how Rudyard Kipling, the Bombay-born English author and poet, described Shwedagon Pagoda ten years after he first saw it in From Sea to Sea and Other Sketches-- Letters of Travel vol. 1 (1899).

About 75 years earlier when the British landed Rangoon, during the first Anglo-Burmese War, they immediately seized and occupied the Shwedagon built on a hillock, made it a fortress in a commanding position over the city, remained there for two years. The Second Anglo-Burmese War saw the British re-occupation of the Shwedagon in April 1852. This time the stupa was to remain under their military control for 77 years until 1929. (Burma, By D. G.E. HALL, M.A., D.LIT., Professor Emeritus of the University of London and

formerly Professor of History in the University of Rangoon, Burma, Third edition 1960.)

In 1920, students from the University of Rangoon met at a pavilion on the southwest corner of the pagoda and planned a protest strike against the new University Act which they believed would only benefit the elite and perpetuate colonial rule. This place is now commemorated by a memorial. The result of the ensuing University Boycott was the establishment of "national schools" financed and run by the Burmese people; this day has been commemorated as the Burmese National Day since.

The terraces of the Shwedagon were again where the student strikers camped out during the second university students strike in history of 1936.

Two years later, oilfield workers on strike hiked all the way from the oilfields of Chauk and Yenangyaung in central Burma to Rangoon to establish a strike camp at the Shwedagon Pagoda

 

 

 

Home | About Us | Contact Us | Special | Features | News | Magazine | Events | TV | Press Release | Advertise With us

Our Products | Work with us | Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Shipping/Delivery Policy


Version 5.0


advertisement


Copyright © 2007-2011 TIME INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT ENTERPRISES CO., LTD. All rights reserved.
Bangkok, Thailand
asean@aseanaffairs.com